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Bernard Tschumi

Bernard Tschumi is Principal of Bernard Tschumi Architects, New York and Paris. He was dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Architecture from 1988 to 2003.

Titles by This Author

Concept-Form

Event-Cities 4 is the latest in the Event-Cities series from Bernard Tschumi, documenting recent built and theoretical projects in the context of his evolving views on architecture, urbanism, and design. Event-Cities 4 follows directly from the work of Event-Cities 3, which examined the interaction of architectural content, concept, and context. This volume takes the interaction a step further, looking at a series of projects for which program or context are insufficient as a generative conceptual strategy, hence requiring a different approach.

Concept vs. Context vs. Content

In Event-Cities 3, Bernard Tschumi explores the complex and productive triangulation of architectural concept, context, and content. There is no architecture without a concept, an overriding idea that gives coherence and identity to a building. But there is also no architecture without context—historical, geographical, cultural—or content (what happens inside). Concept, context, and content may be in unison or purposely discordant.

In Event-Cities (MIT Press, 1994), Bernard Tschumi expanded his architectural concerns to address the issue of cities and their making. Event-Cities 2 continues this project through new selections from his recent architectural projects.


Avant-garde theorist and architect Bernard Tschumi is equally well known for his writing and his practice. Architecture and Disjunction, which brings together Tschumi's essays from 1975 to 1990, is a lucid and provocative analysis of many of the key issues that have engaged architectural discourse over the past two decades—from deconstructive theory to recent concerns with the notions of event and program.

Titles by This Editor

A Columbia Architecture Book

INDEX Architecture documents the extensive cross-fertilization of ideas that can occur between architectural practice and education. Through work developed by students and faculty at Columbia University's School of Architecture, it offers not only an archive of avant-garde work but a record of architectural discourse at a time when the design studio has been radically altered by digital technology.