Skip navigation

Brad Roberts

Brad Roberts is a Research Fellow in International Security Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.

Titles by This Editor

Edited by Brad Roberts

Two factors have brought the world economy to the center of the international political arena: first, the end of the Cold War and the increasing importance of economic factors relative to strategic ones in the foreign policies of the major powers; and, second, the emergence of a rapidly expanding and genuinely global economy that is defined not only by trade but also by investment and the diffusion of advanced technologies and expertise.This collection of 24 articles from The Washington Quarterly examines the features of the new world economic order, beginning with a review of the changing structure of the world economy (including articles on trade, investment, finance, and competitiveness), then turning to a review of the policy debate (with articles on major international institutions, prominent bilateral relationships, and the role of the private sector).Contributors : Kenneth Berlin. Richard E. Bissell. Delia M. Boylan. Daniel F. Burton. Hernando de Soto. Thomas J. Duesterberg. Richard E. Feinberg. James R. Golden. Maurice R. Greenberg. Penelope Hartland- Thunberg. Ryuzaburo Kaku. Ethan B. Kapstein. Amy Kaslow. Joseph LaPalombara. Jeffrey M. Lang. Derek Leebaert. Erik R. Peterson. Ernest H. Preeg. Donald R. Sherk. W. R. Smyser. John D. Sullivan. Heizo Takenaka. Raymond Vernon. Murray Weidenbaum. John Yochelson.A Washington Quarterly Reader

Edited by Brad Roberts

With the end of the Cold War, pundits have made a fetish first of the new world order and then of the new world disorder. Order and Disorder after the Cold War brings together 24 articles from The Washington Quarterly, where some of the most important milestones in these debates have been published. It probes beyond the headlines and the rhetoric to weigh the sources of order and disorder in the post-Cold War era. It first evaluates the changing roles of the major powers, then turns to new political and military challenges to international order, and finally addresses the emerging debate between geopolitics and geoeconomics. A speculative assessment of the emerging world order concludes this timely collection.

Edited by Brad Roberts

These essays collected from recent issues of the Washington Quarterly focus on important questions posed by the end of the Cold War, a changed Soviet Union, changing alliances, regional instabilities, and new security challenges. The twenty-eight chapters are divided into sections that cover U.S. security in the 1990s, peacetime defense policy, security in Europe, international security, and proliferation and arms control.

Edited by Brad Roberts

This timely reader focuses on the broad foreign policy agenda of the 1990s. Traditional as well as new policy issues are considered in light of the recent and far-reaching changes that are occurring abroad. The 23 articles selected from The Washington Quarterly address such important concerns as the United States in a new era, transformed alliances, regional policies, updated policy instruments, a more complex agenda, and the question of U.S. leadership.

Brad Roberts is a Research Fellow in International Security Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.

Contents: Starting at Zero: U.S. Foreign Policy for the 1990s, Robert Hunter. The Crisis of Leninism and the U.S. Response, Robert Scalapino. The Emerging European Security Order, Hans Binnendijk. Germany, Japan, and the False Glare of War, Dan Hamilton and James Clad. The Japan-U.S. Bilateral Relationship: Its Role in the Global Economy, Raymond Vernon. East Central Europe: Democracy in Retreat? Jan Zielonka. Who Killed the Third World? Richard Bissell. Regional Order in the 1990s: Challenge of the Middle East, Richard Haass. Southern Asia After the Cold War, Rodney Jones. In Search of a Latin America Policy, William Perry. After the Cold War: U.S. Interests in SubSaharan Africa, David Newsom. Can Arms Control Survive Peace? James Goodby. U.S. Intelligence in an Age of Uncertainty, Paula Scalingi. Foreign Aid for a New World Order, John Sewell. Public Diplomacy in the Post-Cold War Era, Paul Blackburn. The Security Challenges of Global Environmental Change, Ian Rowland The Future of the International Trading System, Peter Ludlow. The Geopolitical Implications of a Global Capital Shortage, Penelope HartlandThurberg. Global Demographic Trends into the Year 2010, Gregory D. Foster. Democracy, Conflict, and Development in the Third World, Robert L. Rothstein. Democracy and World Order, Brad Roberts. The Quest for Bipartisanship: A New Beginning for a New World Order, Jay Winik. Congress and Foreign Policy, Robert Pastor. Morality and Foreign Policy in America's Third Century, George Weigel. The Comeback of Liberal Internationalism, Richard N. Gardner.

Global Change and U.S. Policy
Edited by Brad Roberts

The collapse of authoritarian and totalitarian governments of both the right and the left has fundamentally changed global politics. Up-to-date and broad in scope, these essays have been carefully selected from The Washington Quarterly to address specific problems, countries, and regions involved in the tide of political change. They provide valuable insights on a resurgence of democracy that is still poorly understood by policymakers and academics alike as well as the foreign policies of the United States.

Contents:
I. The Democratic Prospect. The United States and the World Democratic Revolution , Carl Gershman. Catholicism and Democracy: The Other Twentieth Century Revolution, George Weigel.

II. Democracy Abroad. The Crisis of Communism: The Paradox of Political Participation, Zbigniew Brzezinski. Explosive Change in China and the Soviet Union, Amos A Jordan and Richard Grant. The Prospect for Democracy in Latin America, Mark Falcoff. The Coming of Africa's Second Independence, Colin Lagum.

III. Democracy, Prosperity, and Governance. The Informals Pose an Answer to Marx, Hernando de Soto. Adam Smith Was an Optimist, Ralf Dahrendorf. Turkey's Path to Freedom and Prosperity, Turgut Ozal. Parliamentary vs. Congressional Democracy, Malcolm Churchill. Are Good Democracies Bad Players in the Game of Nations? Josef Joffe.

IV. The United States and the Democratic Revolution Developing Democracy at Home, and Abroad, Charles Robb. Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy, Paula Dobriansky. England, the United States, and the Export of Democracy, Enrique Krauze, U.S. Political Parties Overseas, Joshua Muravchik. Assisting Third World Elections, Marily Ann Zak. International Security and the Crisis of Communism, Brad Roberts. Authoritarian Regimes in Transition, Bans Binnendijk Beyond Authoritarianism and Totalitarianism: Strategies for Democratization, Larry Diamond

Brad Roberts is a Research Fellow in International Security Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington D.C., and Executive Editor of Washington Quarterly.