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Brian Kahin

Brian Kahin is Senior Fellow at the Computer & Communications Industry Association in Washington, DC. He is also Research Investigator and Adjunct Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information and a special advisor to the Provost's Office. He is a coeditor of Transforming Enterprise (MIT Press, 2004) and many other books.

Titles by This Editor

The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind Ásgeirsdóttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-Åke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

The Economic and Social Implications of Information Technology

Innovators across all sectors of society are using information and communication technology to reshape economic and social activity. Even after the boom—and despite the bust—the process of structural change continues across organizational boundaries. Transforming Enterprise considers the implications of this change from a balanced, post-bust perspective. Original essays examine first the impact on the economy as a whole, and, in particular, the effect on productivity; next, the role of information technology in creating and using knowledge—especially knowledge that leads to innovation; then, new organizational models, as seen in the interlocking and overlapping networks made possible by the Internet. The authors also analyze structural changes in specific sectors, including the effect of information technology on the automotive industry, demand-driven production and flexible value chains in the personal computer industry, and new models of outsourced manufacturing in the electronics industry. The final essays examine the societal implications of the diverse ways that information technologies are used—across individuals, groups, communities, and nations, considering questions of access and the digital divide.

Data, Tools, and Research

The rapid growth of electronic commerce, along with changes in information, computing, and communications, is having a profound effect on the United States economy. President Clinton recently directed the National Economic Council, in consultation with executive branch agencies, to analyze the economic implications of the Internet and electronic commerce domestically and internationally, and to consider new types of data collection and research that could be undertaken by public and private organizations.

This book contains work presented at a conference held by executive branch agencies in May 1999 at the Department of Commerce. The goals of the conference were to assess current research on the digital economy, to engage the private sector in developing the research that informs investment and policy decisions, and to promote better understanding of the growth and socioeconomic implications of information technology and electronic commerce. Aspects of the digital economy addressed include macroeconomic assessment, organizational change, small business, access, market structure and competition, and employment and the workforce.

The Economics of Digital Information and Intellectual Property

The rapid growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web is transforming the way information is accessed and used. New models for distributing, sharing, linking, and marketing information are appearing. This volume examines emerging economic and business models for global publishing and information access, as well as the attendant transformation of international information markets, institutions, and businesses. It provides those in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors with a practical framework for dealing with the new information markets. Topics addressed include the effects of various technological factors and market environments on pricing; the relationship among classic production costs, transaction costs, and the economic value of intellectual property; the effects of different pricing practices for telecommunications and Internet services on the pricing of information; the bundling and unbundling of information services; changing cost structures and the allocation of rights among authors, publishers, and other intermediaries; the effects of markets for complementary products and services, including advertising, on the pricing and use of information; and policy implications of different pricing models.

A Publication of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project in Collaboration with the School of Information Management and Systems at the University of California at Berkeley.

For years, the world saw the Internet as a creature of theU.S. Department of Defense. Now some claim that the Internet is aself-governing organism controlled by no one and needing nooversight. Although the National Science Foundation and othergovernment agencies continue to support and oversee criticaladministrative and coordinating functions, the Internet is remarkablydecentralized and uninstitutionalized. As it grows in scope,bandwidth, and functionality, the Internet will require greatercoordination, but it is not yet clear what kind of coordinatingmechanisms will evolve.The essays in this volume clarify these issues and suggest possiblemodels for governing the Internet. The topics addressed range fromsettlements and statistics collection to the sprawling problem ofdomain names, which affects the commercial interests of millions ofcompanies around the world. One recurrent theme is the inseparabilityof technical and policy issues in any discussion involving theInternet.Contributors:Guy Almes, Ashley Andeen, Joseph P. Bailey, Steven M. Bellovin, ScottBradner, Richard Cawley, Che-Hoo Cheng, Bilal Chinoy, K Claffy, MariaFarnon, William Foster, Alexander Gigante, Sharon Eisner Gillett, MarkGould, Eric Hoffman, Scott Huddle, Joseph Y. Hui, David R. Johnson,Mitchell Kapor, John Lesley King, Lee W. McKnight, Don Mitchell,Tracie Monk, Milton Mueller, Carl Oppedahl, David G.Post, YakovRekhter, Paul Resnick, A. M. Rutkowski, Timothy J. Salo, PhilipL. Sbarbaro, Robert Shaw.A publication of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project

Information Policy and the Global Information Infrastructure

Today millions of technologically empowered individuals are able to participate freely in international transactions and enterprises, social and economic. These activities are governed by national and local laws designed for simpler times and now challenged by a new technological and market environment as well as by the practicalities and politics of enforcement across national boundaries.

Borders in Cyberspace investigates issues arising from national differences in law, public policy, and social and cultural values as these differences are reformulated in the emerging global information infrastructure. The contributions include detailed analyses of some of the most visible issues, including intellectual property, security, privacy, and censorship.

 

Despite the global nature of the Information Revolution, most policies for information infrastructure are developed at the national level. These national policies reflect local economic, social, historical, and political circumstances and exhibit remarkable differences in vision, policy design, and implementation strategy. In general, they reflect the reality that private sector will play the leading role in developing the new infrastructure.

National Information Infrastructure Initiatives includes a dozen case studies analyzing how national-level policy initiatives address the challenge of information technology, interactive content, and new applications, as well as the "information superhighway." These contributions examine the interplay of issues in different sectors, including telecommunications, broadcasting, publishing, and information technology. The national cases are supplemented with studies of regional and international initiatives that push and pull on national policies.


Although there are many competing visions of information infrastructure, there is universal agreement that standards will play a critical role. The history of OSI, the Internet, and industry consortia shows that standards development has become a rich, multifaceted process, critically linked to market strategy and major issues of public policy.

The thirty-three contributions to this book present a comprehensive picture of the state of the art in standards development for information technology and the options for federal policy. The book includes both independent analysis and the perspectives of major stakeholders and other interested parties—such as AT&T, the American National Standards Institute, the European Commission, and the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers.

A Publication of the Information Infrastructure Project at Harvard University

This well-balanced collection takes up the important issues in enabling widely available access to the Internet at a time of rapid commercialization and growth.

The seventeen contributions present material that network managers, politicians, and other professionals need to know in order to ask the right questions and properly analyze the various proposals that are being considered for the future of the National Information Infrastructure (NII). Chapters are grouped in five parts: The Public Access Agenda, The Sociology and Culture of the Internet, Establishing Network Communities, Accommodating New Classes of Users, and Pricing and Service Models.

A Publication of the Information Infrastructure Project at Harvard University