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Charles P. Kindleberger

Charles P. Kindleberger is Ford International Professor of Economics Emeritus, MIT and Visiting Professor, Brandeis University.

Titles by This Author

A Retrospective

Charles P. Kindleberger's rich and distinguised career has spanned nearly six decades. The essays collected here reflect the author's shift in interests from foreign exchange to international trade, economic growth, and economic history, especially financial history. They also contain dollops of sociology and political science. Kindleberger views himself as a historical economist who tests economic propositions against the historical record in more than one setting. The collection contains many of the jewels of Kindleberger's work.

This collection of essays addresses the vital question of how much the theory of direct foreign investment - developed a decade ago before many drastic changes took place on the international economic scene - still holds. Grouped in five major sections, they cover The Theory of Direct Foreign Investment; Industrial Organization and International Markets; Country Studies; International Finance; and Implications for the United States.

Charles P. Kindleberger is widely regarded as among the most accessible and intelligent practitioners of the economist's craft. This collection of his papers and lectures, articles and reviews, prepared over the past decade, focuses on the role of multinational corporations in the international economy, their relationships with home and host countries (both developed and less developed), the determinants of their size, the impetus to their investment behavior, their history, the literature about them, and their regulation.

Titles by This Editor

It is generally known that the United States, a large country, has spawned business corporations that transcend international boundaries—"multinationals." What is not generally known is that many smaller countries are rapidly following suit—they too are opening and expanding international operations for their own local firms. This book is the first organized effort by scholars to deal with non-American international corporations as a general phenomenon.

This collection of essays addresses the vital question of how much the theory of direct foreign investment - developed a decade ago before many drastic changes took place on the international economic scene - still holds. Grouped in five major sections, they cover The Theory of Direct Foreign Investment; Industrial Organization and International Markets; Country Studies; International Finance; and Implications for the United States.