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David Leake

Titles by This Editor

Experiences, Lessons, and Future Directions
Edited by David Leake


Case-based reasoning (CBR) is a flourishing paradigm for reasoning and learning in artificial intelligence, with major research efforts and burgeoning applications extending the frontiers of the field.

This book provides an introduction for students as well as an up-to-date overview for experienced researchers and practitioners. It examines the field in a "case-based" way, through concrete examples of how key issues—including indexing and retrieval, case adaptation, evaluation, and application of CBR methods—are being addressed in the context of a range of tasks and domains. Complementing these case studies are commentaries by leading researchers on the lessons learned from experiences with CBR and visions for the roles in which case-based reasoning can have the greatest impact.

A tutorial introduction by Janet Kolodner, one of the originators of CBR, and David Leake makes the book accessible to students and developers starting to apply case-based reasoning. The volume can also serve as a suitable companion for a CBR or introductory AI textbook.

Edited by Ashwin Ram and David Leake

In cognitive science, artificial intelligence, psychology, and education, a growing body of research supports the view that the learning process is strongly influenced by the learner's goals. The fundamental tenet of goal-driven learning is that learning is largely an active and strategic process in which the learner, human or machine, attempts to identify and satisfy its information needs in the context of its tasks and goals, its prior knowledge, its capabilities, and environmental opportunities for learning. This book brings together a diversity of research on goal-driven learning to establish a broad, interdisciplinary framework that describes the goal-driven learning process. It collects and solidifies existing results on this important issue in machine and human learning and presents a theoretical framework for future investigations.

The book opens with an an overview of goal-driven learning research and computational and cognitive models of the goal-driven learning process. This introduction is followed by a collection of fourteen recent research articles addressing fundamental issues of the field, including psychological and functional arguments for modeling learning as a deliberative, planful process; experimental evaluation of the benefits of utility-based analysis to guide decisions about what to learn; case studies of computational models in which learning is driven by reasoning about learning goals; psychological evidence for human goal-driven learning; and the ramifications of goal-driven learning in educational contexts.

The second part of the book presents six position papers reflecting ongoing research and current issues in goal-driven learning. Issues discussed include methods for pursuing psychological studies of goal-driven learning, frameworks for the design of active and multistrategy learning systems, and methods for selecting and balancing the goals that drive learning.

A Bradford Book