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Jakob de Haan

Jakob de Haan is Head of Research at De Nederlandsche Bank and Professor of Political Economy at the University of Groningen.

Titles by This Author

Credibility, Transparency, and Centralization

The adoption of the euro in 1999 by 11 member states of the European Union created a single currency area second in economic size only to the United States. The euro zone's monetary policy is now set by the European Central Bank (ECB) and its Governing Council rather than by individual national central banks. This CESifo volume examines issues that have arisen in the first years of ECB monetary policy and analyzes the effect that current ECB policy strategy and structures may have in the future.

After a detailed description and assessment of ECB monetary policy making that focuses on such issues as price stability and the predictability of policy decisions, the book turns to two important issues faced by European central bankers: the transparency and credibility of decision making and the ECB's decentralized structure. After showing that transparency in decision making enhances credibility, the book discusses the ECB's efforts at openness, its political independence as guaranteed by law, and its ultimate accountability. The book then considers the effects of the decentralized ECB structure, focusing on business cycle synchronization, inflation differentials, and differences in monetary policy transmission in light of the enlargement of the monetary union. The book also discusses options for ECB institutional reforms, including centralization, vote weighting, and cross-border regional banks.

Titles by This Editor

China is now the world’s second largest economy and may soon overtake the United States as the world’s largest. Despite its adoption of some free-market principles, China considers itself a “socialist-market economy,” suggesting that the government still plays a major role in the country’s economic development. This book offers a systematic analysis of four factors in China’s rapid economic growth: exchange rate policy, savings and investment, monetary policy and capital controls, and foreign direct investment (FDI).

Contributors offer fresh perspectives on the undervaluation of the renminbi, the dollar peg, and China’s macroeconomic relationships with the rest of the world. They review factors shaping China’s saving dynamics and analyze the growth of the private sector despite limited access to external finance. They examine the monetary policy independence of the People’s Bank of China, offshore markets for China’s currency, and the effectiveness of China’s capital controls. Finally, they consider Chinese FDI in terms of China’s growing demand for energy and raw materials, exploring the factors that drive China’s FDI in the conventional oil-producing countries and in Africa.