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Kevin Lynch

Kevin Lynch (1918-1984) studied with Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin and later obtained a Bachelor of City Planning degree from MIT. After a long and distinguished career on the faculty of the MIT School of Architecture and Urban Planning, he was named Professor Emeritus of City Planning.

Titles by This Author

Writings and Projects of Kevin Lynch

Kevin Lynch's books are the classic underpinnings of modern urban planning and design, yet they are only a part of his rich legacy of ideas about human purposes and values in built form. City Sense and City Design brings together Lynch's remaining work, including professional design and planning projects that show how he translated many of his ideas and theories into practice.

This new edition of Kevin Lynch's widely used introductory textbook has been completely revised; and is also enriched by the experience of Lynch's coauthor, Gary Hack. For over two decades, Site Planning has remained the only comprehensive source of information on all the principal - activities and concerns of arranging the outdoor physical environment.

With the publication of The Image of the City in 1959, Kevin Lynch embarked upon the process of exploring city form. Good City Form, first published in hardcover under the title A Theory of Good City Form, is both a summation and an extension of his vision, a high point from which he views cities past and possible. 

In one's own image of a city or of a larger environment, the sense of place is inextricably meshed with the sense of time—a financial district that bustles on Friday is transformed into a lifeless concrete desert by Sunday, or the deposits of slow historic change can be spotted around a neighborhood, or renewal bulldozers can suddenly revive a long-suppressed memory of time past. Time and Place—Timeplace—is a continuum of the mind, as fundamental as the spacetime that may be the ultimate reality of the material world.

What does the city's form actually mean to the people who live there? What can the city planner do to make the city's image more vivid and memorable to the city dweller? To answer these questions, Mr. Lynch, supported by studies of Los Angeles, Boston, and Jersey City, formulates a new criterion—imageability—and shows its potential value as a guide for the building and rebuilding of cities.