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Marko Köthenbürger

Marko Köthenbürger is Assistant Professor at the Center for Economic Studies, University of Munich, and Research Director at CESifo.

Titles by This Editor

The trend toward privatization, which began with privatization experiments in the UK under Margaret Thatcher and the deregulation of the telecommunications sector in the United States, has attracted the attention of policymakers over the past two decades. Privatization is broadly supported by most academic economists, but the results of actual privatization efforts seem mixed. In the UK, for example, telecom rates fell sharply after privatization, but privatized rail service was widely perceived to have declined dramatically in quality. In this CESifo volume, international experts examine the experiences of 10 EU countries, evaluating the real outcomes of privatization policies in Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK.The effects of privatization--which includes not only changes in ownership of public activitiesand entities but also liberalization of markets and deregulation--are difficult to distinguish from the effects of other economywide influences. The studies in this volume meet this methodological challenge by using a well-defined set of criteria, including reducing consumer prices, increasing quantity, and improving quality, by which to make their assessments. Background chapters provide a conceptual framework for considering the issues.Contributors:Pablo Arocena, Sean D. Barrett, Ansgar Belke, Michel Berne, Henrik Christoffersen, Andrea Goldstein, Günter Knieps, David Newbery, Martin Paldam, David Parke,r Gérard Pogorel, Friedrich Schneider, Eric van Damme, Ingo Vogelsang, Johan Willner

The success of European monetary integration -- called by the editors of this CESifo volume "one of the most far-reaching, real world experiments in monetary policy to date" -- is not assured. Policy makers have been forced to deal with challenges posed by formulating a uniform monetary policy for countries with asymmetric business cycles and economies in different stages of development as well as with the fiscal and financial implications of a unified currency.The contributors to European Monetary Integration, all prominent economists and scholars, combine theoretical analysis and policy recommendation in their examination of these difficulties. In the first three chapters they consider issues raised by asymmetry problems, including imperfect labor and goods markets, the problem of monetary policy objectives when "one size does not fit all," and the possibility of a bias toward smaller countries in the "one country, one vote" constitutional structure of the European Central Bank. In the last three chapters, they discuss fiscal concerns, including the distribution of seignorage revenues and the interaction of European Central Bank monetary policies and asset price dynamics.