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Titles by This Author

A symposium on condensed-phase processes at high temperatures, particularly in nonmetal systems, which presents a record of recent efforts to understand the field and apply this understanding to complex systems.

A collection of lectures from a special summer program at MIT's Operations Research Center treats topics in operations research for industry, military services, and governmental departments, beginning with the principles and application of probability theory.

A text book designed to give the engineer a reasonably complete coverage of the mathematical topics needed specifically or collaterally in the analysis or synthesis of electrical networks.

A Study of New England Industrial Community, 1937–1939 and 1942

A detailed statistical case study of job changing in a New England city with diversified industries, citing the economic, geographical, social, and psychological factors conducive to worker stability and to worker mobility.

A First Course for Power and Communication Engineers

When originally published in the early 1940s, this series was hailed in the New York Times because it emphasizes "method of thought, and not mere acquisition of facts." This volume extends the circuit theory begun in the first volume into the field of magnetic circuits, and covers both heavy-current power and light-current control, measurement, and communication applications of magnetic materials and transformers.

A Report to the National Commission on Materials Policy

"How do we, in the words of the National Environmental Policy Act, create and maintain conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony and fulfill the social, economic, and other requirements of present and future generations of Americans? That effort is a new and urgent priority; but how can it be translated into workable practices in field, forest, mine, and manufacturing plant?"

No sector of a superpower's defense system is quite so invulnerable against a preemptive attack as its fleet of highly mobile, deep-diving, long-ranging missile-bearing submarines. These make possible a second-strike capability that acts as a forceful deterrent against aggression. But this situation could become unbalanced through the development of effective techniques of strategic antisubmarine warfare (ASW).

In seeking to explain his opinions on a timeless subject—the relations between the sexes—John Stuart Mill admits that he has undertaken an arduous task. For "there are so many causes tending to make the feelings connected with this subject the most intense and most deeply-rooted of all those which gather round and protect old institutions and customs, that we need not wonder to find them as yet less undermined and loosened than any of the rest by the progress of the great modern spiritual and social transition."

China's Great Leap Forward, beginning in 1958, touched almost everything in Chinese life, even the traditions of academic scholarship. The study of history was given special attention, offering the temptation of an entire past to be reinterpreted along Marxist-Maoist lines, and from Great Leap days onward Chinese historians were pressured to a greater or lesser degree to demonstrate how the course of Chinese history was an enactment of the victorious class struggle in its various manifestations.

The Experience in China 1939-1950

From the Preface

Titles by This Editor

Edited by Mit Press

This collection of papers is the result of a desire to make available reprints of articles on digital signal processing for use in a graduate course offered at MIT. The primary objective was to present reprints in an easily accessible form. At the same time, it appeared that this collection might be useful for a wider audience, and consequently it was decided to reproduce the articles (originally published between 1965 and 1969) in book form.

Its Contents, Methods, and Meaning
Edited by Mit Press

Mathematics, which originated in antiquity in the needs of daily life, has developed into an immense system of widely varied disciplines. Like the other sciences, it reflects the laws of the material world around us and serves as a powerful instrument for our knowledge and mastery of nature. But the high level of abstraction peculiar to mathematics means that its newer branches are relatively inaccessible to nonspecialists. This abstract character of mathematics gave birth even in antiquity to idealistic notions about its independence of the material world.