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Pascal Van Hentenryck

Pascal Van Hentenryck is Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Brown University. He is the author or editor of several MIT Press books.

Titles by This Author

Online decision making under uncertainty and time constraints represents one of the most challenging problems for robust intelligent agents. In an increasingly dynamic, interconnected, and real-time world, intelligent systems must adapt dynamically to uncertainties, update existing plans to accommodate new requests and events, and produce high-quality decisions under severe time constraints.

The ubiquity of combinatorial optimization problems in our society is illustrated by the novel application areas for optimization technology, which range from supply chain management to sports tournament scheduling. Over the last two decades, constraint programming has emerged as a fundamental methodology to solve a variety of combinatorial problems, and rich constraint programming languages have been developed for expressing and combining constraints and specifying search procedures at a high level of abstraction.

A Modeling Language for Global Optimization

Titles by This Editor

This collection of twenty-three original papers represents the first effort to bring together the work of constraint programming researchers scattered across multiple disciplines and across the world. The collection contributes to the understanding of the common principles of this emerging general paradigm, the investigation of its theoretical foundations as well as applications to real-world computing problems. It is organized around themes of concurrency and reactive systems, languages and environments, algorithms, computer graphics, and artificial intelligence.

The 11th International Conference

ICLP, which is sponsored by the Association for Logic Programming, is one of two major annual international conferences reporting recent research results in logic programming. Logic programming originates from the discovery that a subset of predicate logic could be given a procedural interpretation, which was first embodied in the programming language Prolog.