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Paul A. Samuelson

Paul Samuelson (1915–2009) received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1970. He was Institute Professor, Emeritus; Professor of Economics, Emeritus; and Gordon Y. Billard Fellow at MIT. His influential Economics: An Introductory Analysis is the most widely used economics textbook ever published.

Titles by This Author

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson’s preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," a reviewer for the Economist once observed, marking both Paul Samuelson’s influence and his astonishing prolificacy. Volumes 6 and 7 gather the Nobel Laureate’s final writings.

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson’s preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," a reviewer for the Economist once observed, marking both Paul Samuelson’s influence and his astonishing prolificacy. Volumes 6 and 7 gather the Nobel Laureate’s final writings.

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson's preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," observes a reviewer in the Economist who goes on to note that "a cynic might add that it would have been better for Professor Samuelson to write less merely to give others a chance to write at all."

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson's preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," observes a reviewer in the Economist who goes on to note that "a cynic might add that it would have been better for Professor Samuelson to write less merely to give others a chance to write at all."

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson's preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," observes a reviewer in the Economist who goes on to note that "a cynic might add that it would have been better for Professor Samuelson to write less merely to give others a chance to write at all."

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson's preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," observes a reviewer in the Economist who goes on to note that "a cynic might add that it would have been better for Professor Samuelson to write less merely to give others a chance to write at all."

"It is a measure of Professor Samuelson's preeminence that the sheer scale of his work should be so much taken for granted," observes a reviewer in the Economist who goes on to note that "a cynic might add that it would have been better for Professor Samuelson to write less merely to give others a chance to write at all."