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Peter D. Grünwald

Peter D. Grünwald is a researcher at CWI, the National Research Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is also affiliated with EURANDOM, the European Research Institute for the Study of Stochastic Phenomena, Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

Titles by This Author

The minimum description length (MDL) principle is a powerful method of inductive inference, the basis of statistical modeling, pattern recognition, and machine learning. It holds that the best explanation, given a limited set of observed data, is the one that permits the greatest compression of the data. MDL methods are particularly well-suited for dealing with model selection, prediction, and estimation problems in situations where the models under consideration can be arbitrarily complex, and overfitting the data is a serious concern.

Titles by This Editor

Theory and Applications

The process of inductive inference—to infer general laws and principles from particular instances—is the basis of statistical modeling, pattern recognition, and machine learning. The Minimum Descriptive Length (MDL) principle, a powerful method of inductive inference, holds that the best explanation, given a limited set of observed data, is the one that permits the greatest compression of the data—that the more we are able to compress the data, the more we learn about the regularities underlying the data.