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Raymond Reiter

Raymond Reiter is Professor and Co-Director of the Cognitive Robotics Project in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto.

Titles by This Author

Logical Foundations for Specifying and Implementing Dynamical Systems

Modeling and implementing dynamical systems is a central problem in artificial intelligence, robotics, software agents, simulation, decision and control theory, and many other disciplines. In recent years, a new approach to representing such systems, grounded in mathematical logic, has been developed within the AI knowledge-representation community.

This book presents a comprehensive treatment of these ideas, basing its theoretical and implementation foundations on the situation calculus, a dialect of first-order logic. Within this framework, it develops many features of dynamical systems modeling, including time, processes, concurrency, exogenous events, reactivity, sensing and knowledge, probabilistic uncertainty, and decision theory. It also describes and implements a new family of high-level programming languages suitable for writing control programs for dynamical systems. Finally, it includes situation calculus specifications for a wide range of examples drawn from cognitive robotics, planning, simulation, databases, and decision theory, together with all the implementation code for these examples. This code is available on the book’s Web site.

Titles by This Editor

Growing interest in symbolic representation and reasoning has pushed this backstage activity into the spotlight as a clearly identifiable and technically rich subfield in artificial intelligence. This collection of extended versions of 12 papers from the First International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning provides a snapshot of the best current work in AI on formal methods and principles of representation and reasoning. The topics range from temporal reasoning to default reasoning to representations for natural language.

Contents: Introduction. Nonmonotonic Reasoning in the Framework of Situation Calculus. The Computational Complexity of Abduction. Temporal Constraint Networks. Impediments to Universal Preference-Based Default Theories. Embedding Decision-Analytic Control in a Learning Architecture. The Substitutional Framework for Sorted Deduction: Fundamental Results on Hybrid Reasoning. Existence Assumptions in Knowledge Representation. Hard Problems for Simple Default Logics. The Effect of Knowledge on Belief: Conditioning, Specificity and the Lottery Paradox in Default Reasoning. Three-Valued Nonmonotonic Formalisms and Semantics of Logic Programs. On the Applicability of Nonmonotonic Logic to Formal Reasoning in Continuous Time. Principles of Metareasoning.