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Richard J. Davidson

Richard J. Davidson is the William James and Vilas Research Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin. He is coeditor of Brain Asymmetry (MIT Press, 1994) and Foundations in Social Neuroscience (MIT Press, 2001).

Titles by This Editor

The folk belief that the left brain hemisphere is dominant for language and the right for visuospatial functions is incomplete and even misleading. Research shows that asymmetries exist at all levels of the nervous system and apply to emotional as well as to higher cognitive processes. Going beyond the authors' previous book, Brain Asymmetry, this book reflects the most recent thinking on functional asymmetries and their structural correlates in brain anatomy. It emphasizes research using new neuroimaging and neurostimulation techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). It also considers clinical applications of asymmetry research. The book contains sections on animal models and basic functions, neuroimaging and brain stimulation studies, visual laterality, auditory laterality, emotional laterality, neurological disorders, and psychiatric disorders.

A full understanding of the biology and behavior of humans cannot be complete without the collective contributions of the social sciences, cognitive sciences, and neurosciences. This book collects eighty-two of the foundational articles in the emerging discipline of social neuroscience.

The book addresses five main areas of research: multilevel integrative analyses of social behavior, using the tools of neuroscience, cognitive science, and social science to examine specific cases of social interaction; the relationships between social cognition and the brain, using noninvasive brain imaging to document brain function in various social situations; rudimentary biological mechanisms for motivation, emotion, and attitudes, and the shaping of these mechanisms by social factors; the biology of social relationships and interpersonal processes; and social influences on biology and health.


The twenty-three contributions in Brain Asymmetry provide a comprehensive survey of modern research on laterality and brain asymmetry, showcasing new approaches and novel domains in which knowledge of the asymmetrical functioning of the brain is a key issue for the complete understanding of the phenomenon. Of particular note is the inclusion of material on laterality, learning, attention, and emotion and their relation to subcortical and peripheral structures and processes. In addition, the clinical relevance of brain asymmetry for neuropsychological and psychopathological practice is surveyed.

Following a preface and historical overview, chapters are divided into eight parts that cover: Phylogenetic Antecedents and Anatomical Bases; Perceptual, Cognitive, and Motor Lateralization; Attention and Learning; Central-Autonomic Integration; Emotional Lateralization; Interhemispheric Interaction; Ontogeny and Developmental Disabilities; and Psychopathology.

Contributors: Marie T. Banich. Brenda E. Berge. Carol A. Boliek. Halle D. Brown. Gerard E. Bruder. Richard J. Davidson. Marian Cleeves Diamond. Jack E. Downhill. Jane E. Edmonds. Albert M. Galaburda. Josh Hall. Anne Harrington. Kenneth M. Heilman. Joseph B. Hellige. Kenneth Hugdahl. George W. Hynd. J. Richard Jennings. Stephen M. Kosslyn. Richard D. Laine. David Warren Lewis. Jacqueline Liederman. Mario Liotti. Richard Marshall. John E. Obrzut. Michael Peters. Robert G. Robinson. Sidney J. Segalowitz. Justine Sergent. Don M. Tucker. Werner Wittling. Eran Zaidel.

A Bradford Book