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Robert I. Rotberg

Robert I. Rotberg is Coeditor of the Journal of Interdisciplinary History, President of the World Peace Foundation, Director of Harvard University's Program on Intrastate Conflict, and Adjunct Professor at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Titles by This Editor

For more than thirty years, interdisciplinary history has included the study of all aspects of the family, including births, marriages, and household composition. This collection looks at the many dimensions of the study of populations and population movements. It ranges across continents and time, showing how the reconstruction of the past is incomplete without attention to questions of fertility and seasonality, as well as to the impact of demographic variables on social, political, and economic history.

Politics and political change are the staples of history. This collection shows how the study of past politics can be deepened by theory and practice from political science, sociology, and economics, and how the application of quantitative methods to received assumptions can expand our understanding of all political history. The contributions cross continents and range in time from the medieval period to the modern. The wide-ranging topics include political confessionalism, urban voter fraud, and methods of electing popes.

A Journal of Interdisciplinary History Reader

For more than thirty years, interdisciplinary historians have studied how groups and individuals in the past progressed despite food scarcities, nutritional deficiencies, exposure to virulent disease pathogens, dangerous forms of sanitation and other public health problems, menacing urban streets, fearsome and infectious sea voyages, and many other morbid and mortal hazards. That populations grew and economies developed is a tribute to many kinds of human advances. But progress was neither linear nor consistent; nor was it equivalent across continents and cultures.

A Journal of Interdisciplinary History Reader

The essays in this book examine how the West modernized and what that modernization meant to human society, particularly in Western Europe and the United States. Within that frame are several distinct subthemes: the process of industrialization in Europe and elsewhere; social mobility, class structures, and class differences; social unrest and the stresses of modernization and industrialization; economic and social equality and inequality and their markers; the role of women in modernization; and the origins of nationalism.