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Robert A. Wilson

Rob Wilson received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cornell University in 1992, and has taught at Queen's University, Canada (1992-1996), and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (1996-2001), where he was a member of the Cognitive Science Group at the university's Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. Since July 2000 he has been professor of philosophy at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, Canada. His areas of professional interest are the philosophy of the mind, the foundations of cognitive science, and the philosophy of biology. He recently edited Species: New Interdisciplinary Essays (MIT Press, 1999), and with Frank Keil, is the general editor of The MIT Press Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MIT Press, 1999). See also his webpage: http://www.ualberta.ca/~philosop/faculty/wilson/.

Titles by This Editor

Since the 1970s the cognitive sciences have offered multidisciplinary ways of understanding the mind and cognition. The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) is a landmark, comprehensive reference work that represents the methodological and theoretical diversity of this changing field.

Explanations seem to be a large and natural part of our cognitive lives. As Frank Keil and Robert Wilson write, "When a cognitive activity is so ubiquitous that it is expressed both in a preschooler's idle questions and in work that is the culmination of decades of scholarly effort, one has to ask whether we really have one and the same phenomenon or merely different cognitively based phenomena that are loosely, or even metaphorically, related."

This is a fully-searchable, complete text of the MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) on a dual-platform CD-ROM.

Since the 1970s the cognitive sciences have offered multidisciplinary ways of understanding the mind and cognition. The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (MITECS) is a landmark, comprehensive reference work that represents the methodological and theoretical diversity of this changing field.

New Interdisciplinary Essays

The concept of species has played a central role in both evolutionary biology and the philosophy of biology, and has been the focus of a number of books in recent years. This book differs from other recent collections in two ways. It is more explicitly integrative and analytical, centering on issues of general significance such as pluralism and realism about species. It also draws on a broader range of disciplines and brings neglected cognitive, anthropological, and historical dimensions to philosophical debates over species.