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Computer Systems Series

Introduction to Object-Oriented Databases provides the first unified and coherent presentation of the essential concepts and techniques of object-oriented databases. It consolidates the results of research and development in the semantics and implementation of a full spectrum of database facilities for object-oriented systems, including data model, query, authorization, schema evolution, storage structures, query optimization, transaction management, versions, composite objects, and integration of a programming language and a database system.

Broadcast media, such as satellite, ground radio, and multipoint cable channels, can easily provide full connectivity for communication among geographically distributed users. One of the most important problems in the design of networks (referred to as packet broadcast networks) that can take practical advantage of broadcast channels is how to achieve efficient sharing of a single common channel.

This collection of original research provides a comprehensive survey of developments at the leading edge of concurrent object-oriented programming. It documents progress—from general concepts to specific descriptions—in programming language design, semantic tools, systems, architectures, and applications. Chapters are written at a tutorial level and are accessible to a wide audience, including researchers, programmers, and technical managers.

Computer systems consisting of many machines will be the norm within a few years. However, making a collection of machines appear as a single, coherent system—in which the location of files, servers, programs, or users is invisible to users who do not wish to know—is a very difficult problem. LOCUS, a distributed version of the popular operating system Unix, provides an excellent solution.

Teaching the theory of error correcting codes on an introductory level is a difficult task. The theory, which has immediate hardware applications, also concerns highly abstract mathematical concepts. This text explains the basic circuits in a refreshingly practical way that will appeal to undergraduate electrical engineering students as well as to engineers and technicians working in industry.

This final report of the Stanford Lisp Performance Study, conducted over a three year period by the author, describes implementation techniques, performance tradeoffs, benchmarking techniques, and performance results for all of the major Lisp dialects in use today. A popular high level programming language used predominantly in artificial intelligence, Lisp was the first language to concentrate on working with symbols instead of numbers.

Today's computers must perform with increasing reliability, which in turn depends on the problem of determining whether a circuit has been manufactured properly or behaves correctly. However, the greater circuit density of VLSI circuits and systems has made testing more difficult and costly.