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Hardcover | $60.00 Short | £41.95 | ISBN: 9780262014724 | 312 pp. | 7 x 9 in | 23 figures| November 2010
 
Paperback | $30.00 Short | £20.95 | ISBN: 9780262514835 | 312 pp. | 7 x 9 in | 23 figures| November 2010
 

Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise

Creating New Kinds of Collaboration

Overview

Cross-disciplinary collaboration increasingly characterizes today’s science and engineering research. The problems and opportunities facing society do not come neatly sorted by discipline. Difficulties arise when researchers from disciplines as different as engineering and the humanities work together and find that they speak largely different languages. This book explores a new framework for fostering collaborations among existing disciplines and expertise communities. The framework unites two ideas to emerge from recent work in STS: trading zones, in which scientific subcultures, each with its own language, develop the equivalents of pidgin and creole; and interactional expertise, in which experts learn to use the language of another research community in ways that are indistinguishable from expert practitioners of that community. A trading zone can gradually become a new area of expertise, facilitated by interactional expertise and involving negotiations over boundary objects (objects represented in different ways by different participants). The volume describes applications of the framework to service science, business strategy, environmental management, education, and practical ethics. One detailed case study focuses on attempts to create trading zones that would help prevent marine bycatch; another investigates trading zones formed to market the female condom to women in Africa; another describes how humanists embedded in a nanotechnology laboratory gained interactional expertise, resulting in improved research results for both humanists and nanoscientists.

Contributors: Brad Allenby, Donna T. Chen, Harry Collins, Robert Evans, Erik Fisher, Peter Galison, Michael E. Gorman, Lynn Isabella, Lekelia D. Jenkins, Mary Ann Leeper, Roop L. Mahajan, Matthew M. Mehalik, Ann E. Mills, Bolko von Oetinger, Elizabeth Powell, Mary V. Rorty, Jeff Shrager, Jim Spohrer, Patricia H. Werhane

About the Editor

Michael E. Gorman is Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Simulating Science and Transforming Nature.

Table of Contents

  • Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
  • Inside Technology
  • edited by Wiebe E. Bijker, W. Bernard Carlson, and Trevor Pinch
  • Janet Abbate,
  • Inventing the Internet
  • Atsushi Akera,
  • Calculating a Natural World: Scientists, Engineers and Computers during the Rise of U.S. Cold War Research
  • Charles Bazerman,
  • The Languages of Edison’s Light
  • Marc Berg,
  • Rationalizing Medical Work: Decision-Support Techniques and Medical Practices
  • Wiebe E. Bijker,
  • Of Bicycles, Bakelites, and Bulbs: Toward a Theory of Sociotechnical Change
  • Wiebe E. Bijker, Roland Bal, and Ruud Hendricks,
  • The Paradox of Scientific Authority: The Role of Scientific Advice in Democracies
  • Wiebe E. Bijker and John Law, editors,
  • Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change
  • Karin Bijsterveld,
  • Mechanical Sound: Technology, Culture, and Public Problems of Noise in the Twentieth Century
  • Stuart S. Blume,
  • Insight and Industry: On the Dynamics of Technological Change in Medicine
  • Pablo J. Boczkowski,
  • Digitizing the News: Innovation in Online Newspapers
  • Geoffrey C. Bowker,
  • Memory Practices in the Sciences
  • Geoffrey C. Bowker,
  • Science on the Run: Information Management and Industrial Geophysics at Schlumberger, 1920–1940
  • Geoffrey C. Bowker and Susan Leigh Star,
  • Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences
  • Louis L. Bucciarelli,
  • Designing Engineers
  • Michel Callon, Pierre Lascoumes, and Yannick Barthe,
  • Acting in an Uncertain World: An Essay on Technical Democracy
  • H. M. Collins,
  • Artificial Experts: Social Knowledge and Intelligent Machines
  • Park Doing,
  • Velvet Revolution at the Synchrotron: Biology, Physics, and Change in Science
  • Paul N. Edwards,
  • The Closed World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America
  • Andrew Feenberg,
  • Between Reason and Experience
  • :
  • Essays in Technology and Modernity
  • Michael E. Gorman, editor,
  • Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise: Creating New Kinds of Collaboration
  • Herbert Gottweis,
  • Governing Molecules: The Discursive Politics of Genetic Engineering in Europe and the United States
  • Joshua M. Greenberg,
  • From Betamax to Blockbuster: Video Stores and the Invention of Movies on Video
  • Kristen Haring,
  • Ham Radio’s Technical Culture
  • Gabrielle Hecht,
  • Entangled Geographies:
  • Empire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold War
  • Gabrielle Hecht,
  • The Radiance of France: Nuclear Power and National Identity after World War II
  • Gabrielle Hecht,
  • The Radiance of France: Nuclear Power and National Identity after World War II, New Edition
  • Kathryn Henderson,
  • On Line and on Paper: Visual Representations, Visual Culture, and Computer Graphics in Design Engineering
  • Christopher R. Henke,
  • Cultivating Science, Harvesting Power: Science and Industrial Agriculture in California
  • Christine Hine,
  • Systematics as Cyberscience: Computers, Change, and Continuity in Science
  • Anique Hommels,
  • Unbuilding Cities: Obduracy in Urban Sociotechnical Change
  • Deborah G. Johnson and Jameson W. Wetmore, editors,
  • Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future
  • David Kaiser, editor,
  • Pedagogy and the Practice of Science: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
  • Peter Keating and Alberto Cambrosio,
  • Biomedical Platforms: Reproducing the Normal and the Pathological in Late-Twentieth-Century Medicine
  • Eda Kranakis,
  • Constructing a Bridge: An Exploration of Engineering Culture, Design, and Research in Nineteenth-Century France and America
  • Christophe Lécuyer,
  • Making Silicon Valley: Innovation and the Growth of High Tech, 1930–1970
  • Pamela E. Mack,
  • Viewing the Earth: The Social Construction of the Landsat Satellite System
  • Donald MacKenzie,
  • An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets
  • Donald MacKenzie,
  • Inventing Accuracy: A Historical Sociology of Nuclear Missile Guidance
  • Donald MacKenzie,
  • Knowing Machines: Essays on Technical Change
  • Donald MacKenzie,
  • Mechanizing Proof: Computing, Risk, and Trust
  • Maggie Mort,
  • Building the Trident Network: A Study of the Enrollment of People, Knowledge, and Machines
  • Peter D. Norton,
  • Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City
  • Helga Nowotny,
  • Insatiable Curiosity: Innovation in a Fragile Future
  • Ruth Oldenziel and Karin Zachmann, editors,
  • Cold War Kitchen: Americanization, Technology, and European Users
  • Nelly Oudshoorn and Trevor Pinch, editors,
  • How Users Matter: The Co-Construction of Users and Technology
  • Shobita Parthasarathy,
  • Building Genetic Medicine: Breast Cancer, Technology, and the Comparative Politics of Health Care
  • Trevor Pinch and Richard Swedberg, editors,
  • Living in a Material World: Economic Sociology Meets Science and Technology Studies
  • Paul Rosen,
  • Framing Production: Technology, Culture, and Change in the British Bicycle Industry
  • Richard Rottenburg,
  • Far-Fetched Facts: A Parable of Development Aid
  • Susanne K. Schmidt and Raymund Werle,
  • Coordinating Technology: Studies in the International Standardization of Telecommunications
  • Wesley Shrum, Joel Genuth, and Ivan Chompalov,
  • Structures of Scientific Collaboration
  • Charis Thompson,
  • Making Parents: The Ontological Choreography of Reproductive Technology
  • Dominique Vinck, editor,
  • Everyday Engineering: An Ethnography of Design and Innovation
  • Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
  • Creating New Kinds of Collaboration
  • edited by Michael E. Gorman
  • The MIT Press
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • London, England
  • © 2010
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher.
  • For information about special quantity discounts, please email special_sales@mitpress.mit.edu
  • This book was set in Stone Sans and Stone Serif by Toppan Best-set Premedia Limited. Printed and bound in the United States of America.
  • Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
  • Trading zones and interactional expertise : creating new kinds of collaboration / edited by Michael E. Gorman.
  •  p. cm. — (Inside technology)
  • Includes bibliographical references and index.
  • ISBN 978-0-262-01472-4 (hardcover : alk. paper) — ISBN 978-0-262-51483-5 (pbk. : alk. paper)
  • 1. Interdisciplinary research. 2. Scientists—Professional relationships. 3. Technology transfer.  4. Intellectual cooperation. 5. Clearinghouses. I. Gorman, Michael E., 1952–
  • Q180.55.I48T725 2011
  • 507.2—dc22
  •                                                             2010008710
  • 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
  • Contents
  • 1 Introduction: Trading Zones, Interactional Expertise, and Collaboration
  • 1
  • Michael E. Gorman
  • I Theory
  • 5
  • 2 Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
  • 7
  • Harry Collins, Robert Evans, and Michael E. Gorman
  • 3 Trading with the Enemy
  • 25
  • Peter Galison
  • 4 Interactional Expertise and the Imitation Game
  • 53
  • Robert Evans and Harry Collins
  • II Applying Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise to Domains of Practice
  • 71
  • 5 Service Science
  • :
  • A New Expertise for Managing Sociotechnical Systems
  • 75
  • Michael E. Gorman and Jim Spohrer
  • 6 From Wizards to Trading Zones
  • :
  • Crossing the Chasm of Computers in Scientific Collaboration
  • 107
  • Jeff Shrager
  • 7 Authenticity, Earth Systems Engineering and Management, and the Limits of Trading Zones in the Era of the Anthropogenic Earth
  • 125
  • Brad Allenby
  • 8 The Evolution of a Trading Zone
  • :
  • A Case Study of the Turtle Excluder Device
  • 157
  • Lekelia D. Jenkins
  • 9 A Network States Approach for Mapping System Changes
  • 181
  • Matthew M. Mehalik
  • 10 Embedding the Humanities in Engineering
  • :
  • Art, Dialogue, and a Laboratory
  • 209
  • Erik Fisher and Roop L. Mahajan
  • 11 Can Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise Benefit Business Strategy?
  • 231
  • Bolko von Oetinger
  • III Ethics and Trading Zones
  • 243
  • 12 Using Trading Zones to Prevent Normalized Deviance in Organizations
  • 245
  • Michael E. Gorman and Patricia H. Werhane
  • 13 Viewing Trading Zones Developed to Advance Health as Complex Adaptive Systems
  • 265
  • Ann E. Mills, Mary V. Rorty, Lynn Isabella, and Donna T. Chen
  • 14 Creating Trading Zones across Continents and Economies
  • :
  • The Female Health Company
  • 281
  • Mary Ann Leeper, Elizabeth Powell, and Patricia H. Werhane
  • 15 
  • Conclusion:
  • Future Research on Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
  • 289
  • Michael E. Gorman
  • Index
  • 297