Ancestors

From Boston Review / Forum

Ancestors

Edited by Ed Pavlić and Evie Shockley

Noted novelists, poets, and essayists, including Samuel R. Delany, Min Jin Lee, Joy Harjo, and Zadie Smith, consider how we are shaped by the past.

Distributed for Boston Review

Overview

Author(s)

Summary

Noted novelists, poets, and essayists, including Samuel R. Delany, Min Jin Lee, Joy Harjo, and Zadie Smith, consider how we are shaped by the past.

It is rare now for people to stay where they were raised, and when we encounter one another—whether in person or online—it is usually in contexts that obscure if not outright hide details about our past. But even in moments of pure self-invention, we are always shaped by the past. In Ancestors, some of today's most imaginative writers—including science fiction master Samuel R. Delany, U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, and novelist Zadie Smith—consider what it means to be made and fashioned by others.

Are we shaped by grandparents, family, the deep past, political forebears, inherited social and economic circumstances? Can we choose our family, or is blood always thicker? And looking forward, what will it mean to be ancestors ourselves, and how will our descendants remember us?

Contributors include

Samuel R. Delany, Tananarive Due, Andrea Lawlor, Min Jin Lee, Joy Harjo, Jericho Brown, Brian Teare, Teju Cole, Domenica Ruta, Zadie Smith, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor, Daisy Hernández, Rita Indiana, Ibi Zoboi, Edwidge Danticat

Paperback

$19.95 T ISBN: 9781946511553 192 pp. | 6 in x 9 in

Editors

Ed Pavlić

Ed Pavlić is the author of Live at the Bitter End; Who Can Afford to Improvise? James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the ListenerLet's Let That Are Not Yet: Inferno; and other books. He is Distinguished Research Professor in the English Department and in the Institute for African American Studies at the University of Georgia.

Evie Shockley

Evie Schockley is an American poet and author of the poetry collections a half-red seathe new black and semiautomatic, a finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. She is Professor of English at Rutgers University.