Alex Klein

  • Myths of the Marble

    Myths of the Marble

    Alex Klein and Milena Hoegsberg

    Myths of the Marble documents a group exhibition that took place in 2017 at the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Norway (HOK) and the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania (ICA). Cocurated by Alex Klein (ICA) and Milena Hoegsberg (HOK), the exhibition reflects upon how the “virtual” has been engaged by contemporary artists as a way to consider the world as a site of possibility and limitation that both permeates physical space and online experience.

    The book features individual profiles of each artist, generously illustrated with images of works spanning painting, sculpture, and installation to video, 16-mm film, and VR technology, as well as exhibition views from both venues. Homay King and Tom Holert each provide essays that meditate upon how virtuality in its various forms offer radical reconfigurations of the body, ecology, and architectural space at a moment when the capacity to depict the world has never been greater, and where reality is itself increasingly articulated as a construction. Rounding out the book is a discussion between artists Cayetano Ferrer, Florian Meisenberg, and Sondra Perry with art historians Iggy Cortez and Marina Isgro, which delves into concepts ranging from the video game “skybox” to the complexities of the “prosthetic.”

    Copublished with the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter and the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania

    Contributors Iggy Cortez, Cayetano Ferrer, Roksana Filipowska, Ane Graff, Milena Hoegsberg, Tom Holert, Charlotte Ickes, Marina Isgro, Rachel de Joode, Homay King, Alex Klein, Ignas Krunglevičius, Chris Marker, Daria Martin, Florian Meisenberg, Shahryar Nashat, Sondra Perry, Jacolby Satterwhite, Susanne M. Winterling

    • Hardcover $38.00

Contributor

  • Public Servants

    Public Servants

    Art and the Crisis of the Common Good

    Johanna Burton, Shannon Jackson, and Dominic Willsdon

    Essays, dialogues, and art projects that illuminate the changing role of art as it responds to radical economic, political, and global shifts.

    How should we understand the purpose of publicly engaged art in the twenty-first century, when the very term “public art” is largely insufficient to describe such practices?  Concepts such as “new genre public art,” “social practice,” or “socially engaged art” may imply a synergy between the role of art and the role of government in providing social services. Yet the arts and social services differ crucially in terms of their methods and metrics. Socially engaged artists need not be aligned (and may often be opposed) to the public sector and to institutionalized systems. In many countries, structures of democratic governance and public responsibility are shifting, eroding, and being remade in profound ways—driven by radical economic, political, and global forces. According to what terms and through what means can art engage with these changes? This volume gathers essays, dialogues, and art projects—some previously published and some newly commissioned—to illuminate the ways the arts shape and reshape a rapidly changing social and governmental landscape. An artist portfolio section presents original statements and projects by some of the key figures grappling with these ideas.

    • Hardcover $44.95