Amelia Groom

Amelia Groom is an art historian and a postdoctoral Fellow at ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry. Her writing on art has been published e-flux journal, Frieze, Art Agenda, and other publications. She edited Time, a volume in the Documents of Contemporary Art series (Whitechapel Gallery/MIT Press).

  • Beverly Buchanan

    Beverly Buchanan

    Marsh Ruins

    Amelia Groom

    An illustrated examination of Beverly Buchanan's 1981 environmental sculpture, which exists in an ongoing state of ruination.

    Beverly Buchanan's Marsh Ruins (1981) are large, solid mounds of cement and shell-based tabby concrete, yet their presence has always been elusive. Hiding in the tall grasses and brackish waters of the Marshes of Glynn, on the southeast coast of Georgia, the Marsh Ruins merge with their surroundings as they enact a curious and delicate tension between destruction and endurance. This volume offers an illustrated examination of Buchanan's environmental sculpture, which exists in an ongoing state of ruination.

    Amelia Groom illuminates Buchanan's vision of sculptural ruination, and probes her remarkable work in terms of ideas of witnessing, documentation, landscape, and cultural memory. Existing in dialogue with land art and postminimalist sculpture, the Marsh Ruins are nevertheless unique refusals of art world classifications and systems of value. Making abstract use of concrete forms, Buchanan's works embody their own stakes, from colonialism's legacies of fracture and dislocation, to the workings of weather and time. In the words of her own mother, Buchanan had always "seen things" in rocks that others didn't see.

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Time

    Time

    Amelia Groom

    A survey of contemporary art and theory that proposes alternatives to outdated linear models of time

    What does 'contemporary' actually mean? This is among the fundamental questions about the nature and politics of time that philosophers, artists and more recently curators have investigated over the past two decades. If clock time—a linear measurement that can be unified, followed and owned—is largely the invention of capitalist modernity and binds us to its strictures, how can we extricate ourselves and discover alternative possibilities of experiencing time?

    Recent art has explored such diverse registers of temporality as wasting and waiting, regression and repetition, déjà vu and seriality, unrealized possibility and idleness, non-consummation and counter-productivity, the belated and the premature, the disjointed and the out-of-sync—all of which go against sequentialist time and index slips in chronological experience. While such theorists as Giorgio Agamben and Georges Didi-Huberman have proposed “anachronistic” or “heterochronic” readings of history, artists have opened up the field of time to the extent that the very notion of the contemporary is brought into question. This collection surveys contemporary art and theory that proposes a wealth of alternatives to outdated linear models of time.

    Artists surveyed include Marina Abramović, Francis Alÿs, Matthew Buckingham, Janet Cardiff, Paul Chan, Olafur Eliasson, Bea Fremderman, Toril Johannessen, On Kawara, Joachim Koester, Christian Marclay, nova Milne, Trevor Paglen, Katie Patterson, Raqs Media Collective, Dexter Sinister, Simon Starling, Hito Steyerl, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Tehching Hsieh, Time/Bank, Mark von Schlegell

    Writers include Giorgio Agamben, Mieke Bal, Geoffrey Batchen, Hans Belting, Walter Benjamin, Franco Berardi, Daniel Birnbaum, Georges Didi-Huberman, Dōgen Zenji, Peter Galison, Boris Groys, Brian Dillon, Elena Filipovic, Joshua Foer, Elizabeth Grosz, Adrian Heathfield, Rachel Kent, Bruno Latour, George Kubler, Doreen Massey, Alexander Nagel, Jean-Luc Nancy, Daniel Rosenberg, Michel Serres, Michel Siffre, Nancy Spector, Nato Thompson, Christopher Wood, George Woodcock

    • Paperback $24.95

Contributor

  • Master of Voice

    Master of Voice

    Lisette Smits

    A collection that looks at the role and use of the nonhuman voice in art.

    The (non)human voice has always been part of modern art, notably within performance art, sound art, and conceptual art. The Master of Voice graduate program mutates from this history, examining the voice as a unique "discipline." The focus is on the (non) human voice, as a means to an end or an end in itself, within artistic practice. A special orientation of the Master of Voice curriculum, codeveloped with a team of artists with a longstanding interest in the (non)human voice, is the voice in relation to technology and gender. This book captures a two-year-long period of research—of thinking, talking, sharing, learning, making, acting, and creating by students and teachers, artists, and other practitioners—to find possible answers and approaches to the question of the voice and its prominent role in our postindustrial society.

    Contributors

    Tyler Coburn, Angelo Custódio, Thom Driver, Paul Elliman, Amelia Groom, Miyuki Inoue, Danae Io, Jamila Johnson-Small, Bin Koh, Snejanka Mihaylova, Maria Montesi, MPA, Natasha Papadopoulou, Duncan Robertson, Marnie Slater, Lisette Smits, Eva Šusová, Cécile Tafanelli, Mavi Veloso, Geo Wyeth

    • Paperback $19.95