Bruno Crispo

  • The Global Internet Trust Register

    The Global Internet Trust Register

    1999 edition

    Ross Anderson, Bruno Crispo, Jong-Hyeon Lee, Charalampos Manifavas, Vaclav Matyas, Jr., and Fabien A. P. Petitcolas

    The development of electronic commerce and other applications on the Internet is held up by concerns about security. Cryptography—the science of codes and ciphers—will be a significant part of the solution, but one of the hardest problems is enabling users to find out which cryptographic key belongs to whom. The main things that can go wrong with cryptography are similar to those that can go wrong with a signature stamp. A stamp can be stolen or counterfeit; or it may not belong to the person one thought it did. The first two risks can be controlled largely by technical measures. The third risk is the hard one, and the one that this book helps to solve.Many people who use cryptographic services on the Internet have had their keys certified by one or more of about a thousand important keys. The pioneers of cryptography hoped that these keys would in turn be certified by the United Nations or by each other, or listed in the phone book. For a variety of political and competitive reasons, this has not happened. The result is chaos, and the situation is bound to get worse as both companies and governments try to stake out claims in cyberspace. The primary aim of this book is to cut through the chaos by publishing the thousand or so important keys in paper form, as a kind of global phone book. The secondary aim is political: By printing these keys on paper, we can use established legal protections to limit government interference.

    • Paperback $32.00

Contributor

  • At Your Service

    At Your Service

    Service-Oriented Computing from an EU Perspective

    Elisabetta Di Nitto, Anne-Marie Sassen, Paolo Traverso, and Arian Zwegers

    Research results from industry-academic collaborative projects in service-oriented computing describe practical, achievable solutions.

    Service-Oriented Applications and Architectures (SOAs) have captured the interest of industry as a way to support business-to-business interaction, and the SOA market grew by $4.9 billion in 2005. SOAs and in particular service-oriented computing (SOC) represent a promising approach in the development of adaptive distributed systems. With SOC, applications can open themselves to services offered by third parties and accessed through standard, well-defined interfaces. The binding between the applications and the services can be, in this context, extremely loose—enabling the ad hoc creation of new services when the need arises. This book offers an overview of some current research in the field, presenting the results of eighteen research projects funded by the European Community's Information Society Technologies Program (IST). The projects, collaborations between industry and academia, have produced practical, achievable results that point the way to real-world applications and future research. The chapters address such issues as requirement analysis, design, governance, interoperability, and the dependability of systems made up of components owned by third parties. The results are presented in the context of two roadmaps for research, one developed by European industry involved in software development and the other by researchers working in the service area. The contributors report first on the “Infrastructure Layer,” then (in the bulk of the book) on the “Service Integration Layer,” the “Semantic Layer,” and finally on the issues that cut across the different layers. The book concludes by looking at ongoing research on both roadmaps.

    • Hardcover $13.75
    • Paperback $50.00