Donatien Grau

  • Paul in Paris / Paris in Paul

    Paul in Paris / Paris in Paul

    Donatien Grau

    In October 2014, Paul McCarthy's work entered the public space of Paris. To accompany the Monnaie de Paris's exhibition of his Chocolate Factory, a workshop producing chocolate trees and Santas, McCarthy installed the massive inflatable sculpture Tree at Place Vendôme. The sculpture's shape was at once reminiscent of a sex toy, a Christmas tree, and a Hans Arp artwork. It caused a public outcry, the artist was attacked, and the work vandalized and ultimately removed. McCarthy's intervention, however, became a symbol for artistic freedom.

    A program was organized over the course of the Monnaie de Paris exhibition with preeminent collaborators, scholars, artists, curators, and writers, all engaged in the discussion of the possibilities of art after the assault on the artist. The participants confronted themselves with the sculpture while being given an open space to unveil their vision and research. Paul in Paris / Paris in Paul brings together these conversations, which reflect on McCarthy's work and present a map of the city's intellectual debates. From the fabrication of chocolate to the symbolism of coins, and from the creative process to the meaning of life, they reveal the vitality of independent thought and consider the impact of the artist's work today.

    Contributors Michel Amandry, Philippe Artières, Bernard Blistène, Barbara Carnevali, Emanuele Coccia, Dennis Cooper, Sylvie Damiens, Tristan Garcia, Donatien Grau, Paul McCarthy, ORLAN, Chiara Parisi, Anaël Pigeat, Israel Rosenfield, Neville Rowley, Olivier Zahm

    • Paperback $27.00
  • Conversation

    Conversation

    Michel Butor, Dan Graham, and Donatien Grau

    One day I went to interview Dan Graham about the legendary John Daniels Gallery in New York, which he ran from 1964 to '65. Right after I arrived, Dan started talking to me about Michel Butor and his fascination with the writer's work back in the 1960s. I merely asked: “And did you ever meet him?” Dan answered: “No. Some people wanted to introduce us, but it never happened.” I asked: “And would you like to meet him?” And he said, with his very own smile: “Of course I would.” —From the editor's preface

    In the fall of 2013, Dan Graham and Mieko Meguro traveled with Donatien Grau to a town in the French Alps to meet Michel Butor, one of the foremost innovators of postwar literature. This is their conversation.

    Michel Butor is a writer. He redefined the genre of the novel, notably with Second Thoughts (1957), further developing new forms with Mobile (1962) and other fundamental works.

    Dan Graham is an artist. A major retrospective of his work was held in 2009 at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Whitney Museum, New York; and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

    • Paperback $16.00
  • The Age of Creation

    The Age of Creation

    Donatien Grau

    In the last two hundred years, “art” has become one of the most fetishized concepts in Western civilization. The idea according to which certain people—also known as artists—would provide the world with their inner vision is a modern myth, but has proved to be a contemporary reality. Today, this post-Romantic conception is challenged by recent geographical and demographic explosions. Being an artist is often seen as an activity, a position, even a “job”—contrary to its first definition at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

    The Age of Creation analyzes the entrance of art into culture at large. Since so much art now considers itself as cultural production, mystical creation has been turned into a minority paradigm. Creation does not intend to embrace culture, but actually to address it and engage in a conversation between the world and its participants. As such, it paves the way for a perpetual reinvention of human life.

    • Paperback $19.95