Kodwo Eshun

Kodwo Eshun lectures in Aural and Visual Culture at Goldsmiths College, University of London. In 2002 he cofounded, with Anjalika Sagar, The Otolith Group, a collective working across film and video, artists' writing, and exhibition curation. He is the author of More Brilliant than the Sun: Adventures in Sonic Fiction and has written for publications including The Guardian, The Wire, and frieze.

  • Dan Graham

    Dan Graham

    Rock My Religion

    Kodwo Eshun

    An illustrated exploration of a groundbreaking work and its connections to New York's art and music scenes of the 1980s.

    Dan Graham's Rock My Religion (1982–1984) is a video essay populated by punk and rock performers (Patti Smith, Jim Morrison, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Eddie Cochran) and historical figures (including Ann Lee, founder of the Shakers). It represented a coming together of narrative voice-overs, singing and shouting voices, and jarring sounds and overlaid texts that proposed a historical genealogy of rock music and an ambitious thesis about the origins of North America's popular culture. Because of its passionate embrace of underground music, its low-fi aesthetics, interest in politics, and liberal approach to historiography, the video has become a landmark work in the history of contemporary moving image and art; but it has remained, possibly for the same reasons, one of Graham's least written about works—underappreciated and possibly misunderstood by the critics who otherwise celebrate him. This illustrated study of Graham's groundbreaking work fills that critical gap.

    Kodwo Eshun examines Rock My Religion not only in terms of contemporary art and Graham's wider body of work but also as part of the broader culture of the time. He explores the relationship between Graham and New York's underground music scene of the 1980s, connecting the artistic methods of the No Wave bands—especially their group dynamics and relationship to the audience—and Rock My Religion's treatment of working class identity and culture.

    • Hardcover $35.00
    • Paperback $19.95

Contributor

  • Boogie Down Predictions

    Boogie Down Predictions

    Hip-Hop, Time, and Afrofuturism

    Roy Christopher

    Essays that explore the connections between time, representation, and identity within hip-hop culture.

    “This book, edited by Roy Christopher, is a moment. It is the deconstructed sample, the researched lyrical metaphors, the aha moment on the way to hip-hop enlightenment. Hip-hop permeates our world, and yet it is continually misunderstood. Hip-hop's intersections with Afrofuturism and science fiction provide fascinating touchpoints that enable us to see our todays and tomorrows. This book can be, for the curious, a window into a hip-hop-infused Alter Destiny—a journey whose spaceship you embarked on some time ago. Are you engaging this work from the gaze of the future? Are you the data thief sailing into the past to U-turn to the now? Or are you the unborn child prepping to build the next universe? No, you're the superhero. Enjoy the journey.” —from the introduction by Ytasha L. Womack

    Through essays by some of hip-hop's most interesting thinkers, theorists, journalists, writers, emcees, and DJs, Boogie Down Predictions embarks on a quest to understand the connections between time, representation, and identity within hip-hop culture and what that means for the culture at large. Introduced by Ytasha L. Womack, author of Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture, this book explores these temporalities, possible pasts, and further futures from a diverse, multilayered, interdisciplinary perspective.

    • Paperback $21.95
  • Navigation Beyond Vision

    Navigation Beyond Vision

    e-flux journal

    How the shift from montage to navigation alters the way images—and art—operate as models of political action and modes of political intervention.

    Navigation begins where the map becomes indecipherable. Navigation operates on a plane of immanence in constant motion. Instead of framing or representing the world, the art of navigation continuously updates and adjusts multiple frames from viewpoints within and beyond the world. Navigation is thus an operational practice of synthesizing various orders of magnitude.

    Only a few weeks prior to his untimely death in 2014, Harun Farocki briefly referred to navigation as a contemporary challenge to montage—editing distinct sections of film into a continuous sequence—as the dominant paradigm of techno-political visuality. For Farocki, the computer-animated, navigable images that constitute the twenty-first century's "ruling class of images" call for new tools of analysis, prompting him to ask: How does the shift from montage to navigation alter the way images—and art—operate as models of political action and modes of political intervention?

    Contributors

    Ramon Amaro, James Bridle, Maïté Chénière, Kodwo Eshun, Anselm Franke, Jennifer Gabrys, Tom Holert, Inhabitants, Doreen Mende, Matteo Pasquinelli, Laura Lo Presti, Patricia Reed, Nikolay Smirnov, Hito Steyerl, Oraib Toukan, and Brian Kuan Wood.

    • Paperback $24.00
  • The Films of Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen

    The Films of Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen

    Scripts, Working Documents, Interpretation

    Oliver Fuke

    An examination of Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen's independent and collaborative films and their intersections with feminism, film theory, and psychoanalysis.

    This book examines renowned theorists Laura Mulvey and Peter Wollen's independent and collaborative films, focusing how they intersect with feminism, film theory, and psychoanalysis.

    The aim of the volume is broadly threefold: to encourage further study of Mulvey and Wollen's contributions to the theory and practice of experimental film; to draw attention to the value of their scrips as written texts; and to challenge the common misconception that their individual and collaborative filmmaking practices end at the close of the 1970s. The historical overview provided by Mulvey in her introduction underscores the sense that their individual and collaborative films were the result of sustained attempts to make political films under rapidly changing economic and political conditions.

    • Hardcover $36.95
  • Futurity Report

    Futurity Report

    Eric C. H. de Bruyn and Sven Lütticken

    Theorists, historians, and artists address the precarious futurity of the notion of the future itself.

    Not long ago, a melancholic left and a manic neoliberalism seemed to arrive at an awkward consensus: the foreclosure of futurity. Whereas the former mourned the failure of its utopian project, the latter celebrated the triumph of a global marketplace. The radical hope of realizing a singularly different, more equitable future was displaced by a belief that the future had already come to pass, limiting post-historical society to an uneventful life of endless accumulation. Today, amidst an abundance of neofuturisms, posthumanisms, futurologies, speculative philosophies, and accelerationist scenarios, there is as well an expanding awareness of a looming planetary catastrophe driven by the extractionist logic of capitalism. Despite this return to the future, the temporal horizon of our present moment is perhaps more aptly characterized by the “shrinking future” of just-in-time production, risk management, high-frequency trading, and the futures market. In Futurity Report, theorists, historians, and artists address the precarious futurity of the notion of the future itself.

    Contributors

    McKenzie Wark, China Miéville, Kerstin Stakemeier, Diedrich Diederichsen, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Marina Vishmidt, Johannes Paul Raether, Felicity D. Scott, Silvia Maglioni, Graeme Thomson, Doreen Mende, Pedro Neves Marques, Achille Mbembe, Kodwo Eshun, Haytham El-Wardany, T. J. Demos, Ana Teixeira Pinto

    • Paperback $29.95