Paul Chaney

  • Earth Leakage Trip

    Earth Leakage Trip

    Paul Chaney

    The travails, triumphs, and disappointments of eco-life, viewed through the prism of artistic research.

    In 2004, distressed by the insanity of capitalist consumerism but dissatisfied with mere utopian rhetoric, self-taught artist Paul Chaney went “back to the land” for real. During the next eight years spent creating FIELDCLUB, a self-sufficient four-acre off-grid settlement in the UK, Chaney continually scrutinized the travails, triumphs, and disappointments of eco-life through the prism of artistic research. What emerges from this durational embedded practice is a vision characterized by a delicate equipoise between irony and sincerity and shot through with absurdism, in which speculative materialist philosophies are reworked in close contact with the humiliating tribulations of “living with nature.” In a shifting experimental triangulation of the human, the non-human, and the technological, themes such as geotrauma, dark ecology, and accelerationism are stress-tested, reconfigured, and supplemented with new concepts including the apocalyptic vernacular, carboniferous insurgency, and the solar contemporary.

    Richly illustrated with sketches, diagrams, notes, and photographic documentation of his work, Earth Leakage Trip explores these concepts and collects Chaney's raw self-reflections on his itinerary as an artist-outsider and as a human being—that extravagantly enlightened species that nonetheless remains physically enmeshed with others.

    • Paperback $29.95

Contributor

  • When Site Lost the Plot

    When Site Lost the Plot

    Robin Mackay

    This collection charts some of the ways in which site continues to be a concern for contemporary practice, and introduces the concept of “plot” as an alternative.

    The critical concept of site-specificity once seemed to harbour the potential for disruption. But site-specific work has become increasingly assimilated into the capitalist logic of regeneration and value creation. The materialist critique of the art object has been shortcircuited by the franchised idiosyncrasies of international nomad flâneurs. And on a planet whose entire surface is mapped and apped, the concept of “site” itself becomes ever more problematic.

    How can we do justice to the particularity of local sites while unearthing their material conditions? What do a contemporary “geo-philosophy” and the historical legacy of site-specific art have to offer each other? Can we develop methods for the controlled unpacking of the local into the global, avoiding trivial reconciliations between local sites and their global conditions? When Site Lost the Plot charts some of the ways in which site continues to be a concern for contemporary practice; and introduces the concept of “plot” as an alternative approach.

    Alongside artists discussing their practice and their approach to site and plot, contributors from various disciplines introduce concepts from cartography, mathematics, film, fiction, design, and philosophy.

    • Paperback $19.95