Quang-Tuan Luong

Quang-Tuan Luong is a computer scientist in the Artifical Intelligence Center at SRI International, California.

  • The Geometry of Multiple Images

    The Geometry of Multiple Images

    The Laws That Govern the Formation of Multiple Images of a Scene and Some of Their Applications

    Olivier Faugeras and Quang-Tuan Luong

    This book formalizes and analyzes the relations between multiple views of a scene from the perspective of various types of geometries. A key feature is that it considers Euclidean and affine geometries as special cases of projective geometry.

    Over the last forty years, researchers have made great strides in elucidating the laws of image formation, processing, and understanding by animals, humans, and machines. This book describes the state of knowledge in one subarea of vision, the geometric laws that relate different views of a scene. Geometry, one of the oldest branches of mathematics, is the natural language for describing three-dimensional shapes and spatial relations. Projective geometry, the geometry that best models image formation, provides a unified framework for thinking about many geometric problems are relevant to vision. The book formalizes and analyzes the relations between multiple views of a scene from the perspective of various types of geometries. A key feature is that it considers Euclidean and affine geometries as special cases of projective geometry. Images play a prominent role in computer communications. Producers and users of images, in particular three-dimensional images, require a framework for stating and solving problems. The book offers a number of conceptual tools and theoretical results useful for the design of machine vision algorithms. It also illustrates these tools and results with many examples of real applications.

    • Hardcover $80.00
    • Paperback $55.00

Contributor

  • Scene Vision

    Scene Vision

    Making Sense of What We See

    Kestutis Kveraga and Moshe Bar

    Cutting-edge research on the visual cognition of scenes, covering issues that include spatial vision, context, emotion, attention, memory, and neural mechanisms underlying scene representation.

    For many years, researchers have studied visual recognition with objects—single, clean, clear, and isolated objects, presented to subjects at the center of the screen. In our real environment, however, objects do not appear so neatly. Our visual world is a stimulating scenery mess; fragments, colors, occlusions, motions, eye movements, context, and distraction all affect perception. In this volume, pioneering researchers address the visual cognition of scenes from neuroimaging, psychology, modeling, electrophysiology, and computer vision perspectives.

    Building on past research—and accepting the challenge of applying what we have learned from the study of object recognition to the visual cognition of scenes—these leading scholars consider issues of spatial vision, context, rapid perception, emotion, attention, memory, and the neural mechanisms underlying scene representation. Taken together, their contributions offer a snapshot of our current knowledge of how we understand scenes and the visual world around us.

    ContributorsElissa M. Aminoff, Moshe Bar, Margaret Bradley, Daniel I. Brooks, Marvin M. Chun, Ritendra Datta, Russell A. Epstein, Michèle Fabre-Thorpe, Elena Fedorovskaya, Jack L. Gallant, Helene Intraub, Dhiraj Joshi, Kestutis Kveraga, Peter J. Lang, Jia Li Xin Lu, Jiebo Luo, Quang-Tuan Luong, George L. Malcolm, Shahin Nasr, Soojin Park, Mary C. Potter, Reza Rajimehr, Dean Sabatinelli, Philippe G. Schyns, David L. Sheinberg, Heida Maria Sigurdardottir, Dustin Stansbury, Simon Thorpe, Roger Tootell, James Z. Wang

    • Hardcover $65.00