Solveig Øvstebø

  • Seductive Exacting Realism

    Seductive Exacting Realism

    Irena Haiduk and Solveig Øvstebø

    A 13-volume set of Marcel Proust's collected works was published in Yugoslavia in 1967. This edition, in the Latin alphabet, was highly valued by Yugoslav intelligentsia for its elegant translation from French by the poet Tin Ujević. During the Bosnian civil war, these Proust sets fetched up to the equivalent of a full year's salary in the Belgrade black markets. They were frequently looted together with other valuables from Bosnian homes. The set exhibited in Irena Haiduk's “Seductive Exacting Realism” was seized by local police from Belgrade Kalenić Market in 1995. It was acquired at a public auction in 2014. It is missing volume number 12.

    Published on the occasion of Irena Haiduk, “Seductive Exacting Realism”—a two-part project that was presented as parallel exhibitions at the Renaissance Society and the 14th Istanbul Biennial—this volume features contributions by Ivo Andrić, Hannah Feldman, Irena Haiduk, Monika Szewczyk, Marina Vishmidt, and Solveig Øvstebø.

    Copublished with Renaissance Society

    ContributorsIvo Andrić, Hannah Feldman, Irena Haiduk, Monika Szewczyk, Marina Vishmidt, Solveig Øvstebø

    • Hardcover $34.00
  • Surplus

    Surplus

    Marianne Heier, Solveig Øvstebø, and Steinar Sekkingstad

    Although Marianne Heier abandons the traditional exhibition spaces in connection with her projects, Art with a capital A is still always measured against other social constructs. At this point of intersection, Heier looks at the typical features of the various economies or values of given fields and how they overlap and collide. What, for example, characterizes the value of art compared with the concept of value in the global market economy? What can be translated? What is not for sale? With this approach, Heier turns the focus on distinctions between cultural and economic capital, which are further problematized inasmuch as the physical works or interventions often end up as gifts to the institution with which she works. The gift economy as a phenomenon and theoretical entity is therefore central to Heier's art production.

    Through “Surplus,” an extensive physical intervention in front of Bergen Kunsthall, Heier demonstrated an unbudgeable faith that art has a value different from the one that can simply be negotiated on a market. Surplus can, from this perspective, also refer to a kind of “surplus value.”

    This publication builds on Heier's investigative process. Instead of a retrospective analysis of her oeuvre, contributions by writers and researchers from various disciplines have become an important part of the exhibition project in their own right. The project renders visible societal structures and consequences of such structures—of which we are not always aware. By shifting the perspective slightly, we can perhaps glimpse distinct values and new outcomes.

    Copublished with Bergen Kunsthall

    ContributorsThomas Hylland Eriksen, Marianne Heier, Ranjit Hoskote, Loretta Napoleoni, Solveig Øvstebø, and Kim West

    • Hardcover $40.00

Contributor

  • The long gaze, the short gaze

    The long gaze, the short gaze

    Knut Åsdam

    For several decades Norwegian artist Knut Åsdam has worked independently and uncompromisingly with his artistic projects, and he is today considered one of the central contemporary practitioners of film and video art. This book appears as a result of Åsdam's 2010 exhibition at Bergen Kunsthall, and the production of his two new films Abyss and Tripoli (both 2010).

    Concepts like transformation and relocation constitute a thematic framework for most of Åsdam's works. In his films and photographs, for example, relocation is about the migration of people between land areas, or about physical movement and the bodily experience of architecture in urban surroundings. Transformation is a key word in terms of social, economic, linguistic, psychological, identity-related and architectural processes of change. Underlying this is an awareness that the meaning of architecture is changeable and that it is experienced and expressed differently by different social groupings. Perhaps even more than before, the places portrayed are themselves central to the new films Abyss and Tripoli, not only as generic urban surroundings, but also with their distinct histories, demographic conditions, and architecture.

    Åsdam has long worked with the exploration of all the components of the language of film, and consequently the filmic has also become a central theme in this book. Under the title The long gaze, the short gaze, this publication presents a collection of new commissioned texts that do not only deal with the new films, but also place them in a retrospective context with the whole of Åsdam's film production in the 2000s.

    Co-published with Bergen Kunsthall

    • Hardcover $39.95